NWH Ownz




If you want to download anything from this page, click here.


You can also find extra files there.


Source code has reference numbers where you can find the source and archieve for here.


Stealing XSS payloads

Ownz is probably going to be the most cancerous, cringest person I have created a page for.

It's also important to know that Ryan wants to create his own cyber security service. Ths reason this is important is because he knows NOTHING about security, networking, businesses or coding like he pretends.

The best thing about this is Ryan thought changing "mysite" to "targetsite" in the payload will make it look like he found it. After Google'ing "Akamai XSS payload", look what I found.

Click -->   Google result


Click -->   Original payload, tweeted on the 18th of June 2018.


Click -->   Stolen payload, tweeted on the 11th of September 2018.



Let's play spot the difference!

    ?"></script><base%20c%3D=href%3Dhttps:\mysite> <-- @zseano's payload
     ?"></script><base%20c%3D=href%3Dhttps:\targetsite> <-- Ryan's payload
    

Botted followers

I decided to scroll through his followers list. After going through maybe 8 pages the botted followers started to become way more obvious. I had only taken 6 screenshots however feel free to scroll about 80+ more pages of obvious bots.

Click -->   Botted followers 1


Click -->   Botted followers 2


Click -->   Botted followers 3


Click -->   Botted followers 4


Click -->   Botted followers 5


Click -->   Botted followers 6



Spotify bruteforcer

So Ryan went to an IBTimes journalist saying he created a cracking tool for Spotify. He then went on to claim he went on trial for creating the tool. So, what is this Spotify cracker you're wondering? It's a Spotify bruteforcer than you can find anywhere on the internet just from searching "Spotify cracker", "Spotify bruteforcer" or similar. What he done was take a script he found, edited it to print he made it then BAMN, claimed he made it.


Sim locator

Based on some new research from the Cyber Security professional Ryan Jackson, evidence shows the method of how carriers are able to locate their customers.

This breaking new research shows that the carrier do this by assigning their customers 4 IP addresses. Previously it was believed that customers connecting to LTE through the same tower would share a set of dynamic IPs, however this has now been proven incorrect.

It was also believed carriers would find their customers location from pinging the customers SIM and triangulating the coordinates, however using an ISP method of assigning static or temporary dynamic IPs to a customer and having it on their customers account will give their address and a simple geo-location check would show their current location.


XMLRPC

So despite all these years of being a supa leet hacker, Ryan had only found out about XMLRPC pingback. He's also acting as if hardly anyone knows about it. You know, the supa leet hacker boss as he calls himself on his self-written SecJuice article. Who would have thought. The hacker boss himself. After all these years only finding out that XMLRPC has always been a powerful amp method. Just something you could never imagine.


Linux utility guru

This is one thing that is hard to read without getting annoyed at how stupid people in this world can be.

Firstly, I just want to point out that he is calling dstat a debugging tool. You know, it's not like it's a resource monitoring tool or anything. But he also calls other tools debug tools. Sure, some can be used for debugging but he calls them debug tools. Think what you want for yourself on this one.


Fake C botnet

Also in his own reply you can see that he is admitting to a crime, despite trying to be a profesional cyber security expert offering security services.

Other than him trying to pretend he actually created anything, let's focus on the date the tweet was made. 15th September 2018. Ok, ok. But wait, what's that? The DStat says from 2016 to 2016? Huh? But, I thought he really created a C botnet!?

Even though he just dropped himself into it, proving not only he knows nothing about botnets or coding, but looking at the methods I can't help but notice he put TCP seperate from 3 TCP flags. According to Mr. Jackson, TCP, ACK, SYN and PSH are different methods. You know, not like ACK, SYN and PSH are flags, and even if it was just TCP it would NEED a flag or anything.


1Tbps botnet

So, it seems like Ownz is trying to claim this was a botnet hitting 1Tbps. This was when they tried to take credit for the DynDNS attack just for Dyn to shit all over their claims. I don't think Ownz understands how botnets work. For them to claim that the bandwidth used was to show how much is being used per second, from that botnet is just incredibly stupid. Firstly, that's TOTAL bandwidth used. Quite clear what it's saying. Secondly, you're not going to get the total usuage like that from the botnet. You literally took a fucking screenshot of the bandwidth that was used loading the site for people visiting your shitty websites?

Oh, must I made the suggestion to check the NWH page? Because there is also proof NWH stole a 241Gbps all whilst claiming to have used a 1Tbps botnet. :)


Below are the two images that are in the tweet.

Click -->   First Image


Click -->   Second Image



IP range

Ahhh, what a world we live in. So the networking professional Ownz, which is why he's such a DDoS god as shown above, below and the NWH page comes out to prove to everyone wrong that an IP range is actually shown such as 0.0.0.x rather than 192.168.0.0 – 192.168.255.255.

Also Ryan pretends he rooted a botnet. Yeah, let's just let him stay in his fantasy world and not ask him any more questions about that.


DDoS boss

So Ryan called himself a DDoS boss in his SecJuice article. Please go below and read it for some more laughs.

Click -->    The SecJuice article


Click -->   End-to-end encryption stops DDoS attacks!





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